Word For Mac Vba

Word on the Macintosh is basically Word for Windows re-compiled to run on the Mac. It's not just 'compatible'. It's not just 'like' Word for the PC. It is Microsoft Word, the same one Microsoft makes for every platform. However:

  1. Excel Vba Mac Open Files
  2. Word For Mac Vba Shortcut
  3. Word For Mac Vba File
  4. Wps Mac Vba
  5. Excel For Mac Vba
  6. Word Mac Vba Editor

R/vba: A place for questions and discussion on Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) and its associated integrated development environment (IDE). Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. See more: chicago freelance microsoft word mac expert, microsoft word parse text macro, microsoft word mail merge vba macro, word vba find and select text, word vba select text, word vba select page, word vba select line, word vba select first line, word vba move cursor position, word vba goto end of document, word vba set cursor position, word. I have created an Excel-workbook with a VBA form in it for saving information in a new sheet every time you use the form. It works brilliant on my PC, but on my friends Mac it doesn't work at all. I'll add the code here and if there's anyone out there with a good answer please let me know how to make this work on a Mac. A reader who wishes to remain anonymous seeks a way to create form letters with Office 2011. Said reader writes: I am looking for a way to do an e-mail merge using Outlook 2011 (or even Entourage. There are a couple of fairly big features that, while not missing entirely from the Office.

  • Not all of the modules of Word on the PC are included in Word for the Mac.
  • Word for the iPhone and Word for the iPad are quite different.
  • Word for the web browser (Office 365) is completely different: a very lite version.

The cost and number of person-hours spent developing Word is mind-boggling. It's well over a billion dollars, and there are well over ten thousand person-years of effort in it. Making a new one just for the Mac would have been so expensive that a copy of Word would cost several thousand dollars. You might buy two at that price, but the rest of us couldn't afford it!

Because it is the same software, and Microsoft has a policy of bringing the two versions closer together, the differences will become less over time. Essentially, each version on the PC is matched a year later by a version on the Mac (Microsoft is trying to reduce that gap, recently the Mac Business Unit became part of the main Office Business Unit that makes Office for every platform).

Macintosh

Equivalent PC Version

Word 2013

Word 2010

Word 2007

Word 2011

Word 2003

Word 2008

Word 2002

Word 2004

Word 2000

Word v.X

Word 2000

Word 2001

Word 2000

Word 98

Word 97

Word 6

Word 95

Word 5

Word 6

Same File Formats Used in Mac and PC

Mac Office MVP Jim Gordon writes: 'The Microsoft Office file format Open XML (OOXML) is for Word, Excel and PowerPoint files and used on both the Mac and the PC. The file format was accepted by an international standards body. Office 2010 for Windows with service pack 2 or later and Office 2011 for Mac comply strictly with the standard. Office 2008 for Mac and 2007 and 2010 for Windows prior to service pack 2 comply about 98% of the way to the standard (there's a very minor exception in Excel).

'Microsoft also ships a set of fonts with the same names on both Microsoft Office for Mac and PC. The fonts distributed with Mac Office have been very carefully adjusted ('hinted') so documents on the Mac will look and orint the same way as documents using the PC versions of those fonts on the PC. The differences are tiny, but they account for the differences in the way the Mac places pixels on the screen.

'As for having documents be identical when moving from one computer to another there are factors you must consider. This is true PC to PC, PC to Mac, Mac to Mac, and Mac to PC. Microsoft Word is a word processor that has text that flows, unlike a PDF or page layout program. Any difference in font or printer driver from one machine to another has the potential to affect spacing, breaks, window & orphans, paragraphs, etc. To repeat - these changes have nothing to do with Mac to PC, rather they are caused by computer to computer differences.

'Your documents should look the same on the Mac as long as ALL of these conditions are met:

  • The documents on the PC originated in Microsoft Word 2010 with service pack 2
  • The documents were saved in a current OOXML file format in Word 2010
  • The documents used only fonts supplied with Microsoft Office 2010
  • Old versions of the same fonts are not installed or active on either the Mac or the PC
  • The documents are opened on the Mac in Microsoft Word 2011
  • The current versions of the Microsoft Office fonts are active on the Mac
  • The printer driver on the Mac behaves identically to the printer driver that was being used on the PC where the documents were saved.
Word for mac vba tutorial

The behavior of Word is identical on the two platforms, provided the above conditions are met, if you want your documents to look alike when moving from one computer to another - regardless of platform. It's the fonts, file formats and printer drivers that are the sticky points when moving a document from one computer to another regardless of platform.'

Rules of Thumb

Having said all this:

Excel Vba Mac Open Files

  • It’s a totally moving target. Every patch Tuesday, something changes.
  • Network Templates 'Don’t' work in Mac Word. Due to multiple bugs in the file path resolving and handling mechanism, templates in network directories should not be shared between PC Word and Mac Word. For a long and happy life, copy the templates locally to the user's My Templates folder on the Mac.
  • Ribbon Customizations are not available in Mac Word. They will be silently ignored, unless done in code, where they will blow up.
  • Mac Word can use ONLY TrueType fonts and OpenType fonts with TrueType outlines. Other fonts will not appear/work or occasionally, crash.
  • The color table is markedly different between Mac and PC (and even between PowerPoint and Word/Excel on the Mac). Generally Mac Office has a wider gamut, but Mac monitors have a very different gamma. Unless you are prepared to create color profiles and carefully color-match every device in the chain on both the PC and the Mac, just accept that colors are going to look quite different. It is expensive and time-consuming to fix this, and you will never get it perfect.
  • Various commands in Mac Word exist only in the menu bar, which Mac Word still has, or on the toolbars that Mac Word still has. Toolbars remain customizable in Mac Word.
  • The same physical printer will often produce different results from the same document depending on whether the printer driver is on a Mac or a PC. If the printer driver is running on a Print Server, results will be closer (but remember: the fonts are different!).
  • Design for the Difference, Design for Re-Flow. Do not use hard page breaks anywhere. Minimize section breaks. Use paragraph properties to manage pagination. Assume your user is going to throw an A4 document onto a US Letter paperstock, or vice versa. Assume that a Mac will reflow text by about half a per cent. The people who have real trouble are the ones that have used floating text boxes and spaces to try to line things up: that will produce word-salad. Tossed word-salad…
  • Jim says 'The text-flow problem is the same as you will find moving from one PC to another where font versions and default printer driver are different. The fonts provided by Microsoft should provide smooth cross-platform sailing provided the same version of each is the active version on all machines involved.'

Differences in Appearance

On each platform, Word adopts the default appearance of the Operating System. There is almost nothing that you see on the screen that is drawn by Word: on the Mac, the display is created by Mac OS; on the PC, by Windows. It saves money and it saves vast amounts of disk space and processor power.

The only difference you are likely to notice is that if you are in OS X, the window controls are on the opposite side to Windows.

Different Keystrokes

On the Mac the Command (Apple) key is the Control Key in Windows, whereas the Control Key from the Mac is the Right-Click in Windows.

On a Windows keyboard, the Control key is always labeled Ctrl. On a Mac keyboard, expect to find the or ? symbol on the Command key. (These characters will not display on the PC; they should look like this:.) This paragraph is a classic example of the cross-platform font difficulties you will experience. There is no default font common to the PC and the Mac that contains both of those characters (in case you are interested, that's 'Lucida Grande', the most wide-ranging of the Mac OS X Unicode fonts).

Word is very right-click-centric. If you do not have a two-button mouse, you will find it is a very worthwhile investment if you are going to spend much time in Word.

Windows

Macintosh

Control KeyCommand (Apple) Key
Right-Click Control-Click
ctrl+c Command+c
ctrl+v Command+v
ctrl+s Command+s
File>Close Command+w
ctrl keyOption Key
ctrl+q Command+Option+q
ctrl+space Ctrl+space
Tools>Options Word>Preferences
File>New Task PaneProject Gallery
Mail Merge Task PaneData Merge Palette

The Control-Click (or Right-Click) brings up the 'context menu' wherever you happen to be. In Word almost everything you want to do, or everything you want to know, will appear on the right-click. The menus that appear vary dramatically depending on where your mouse-pointer is.

Word also responds to the scroll-wheel if you have one. (Not all windows; for example preferences and options dialogs do not...). Mouse scroll wheel support in Word pre-X depends totally on the mouse drivers. Microsoft drivers for the Microsoft Mouse generally work (and will often drive other companies' mice!).

In Windows, the keyboard shortcuts are listed in the Help, in a topic surprisingly enough called 'keyword shortcuts'. On the Mac, only some of the keystrokes are listed, in various topics such as 'About using shortcut keys' and 'Select text and graphics'. To find the list on either platform, use Search from the Microsoft Office Help to look for the word 'keyboard'.

You can look at the Key Assignments by using Tools>Customize>Keyboard on either platform. If you select a command, and it has a key assignment, the Customize dialog will tell you what it is. This is a better place to look than the Help, because users can (and should) change their keystrokes to suit themselves on either platform. The Customize dialog also includes a handy Reset button if you decide you do not like the keystrokes you inherited from the previous user on that computer.

Finally, each version of Word enables you to print a list of the currently-assigned keystrokes so you can stick them on the wall. To print them on the Mac:

  1. Go to Tools>Macro>Macros
  2. In the Macros In pop-up menu, click Word Commands
  3. In the Macro name box click ListCommands
  4. Click Run
  5. In the List Commands dialog, click Current Menu and Keyboard settings and OK
  6. On the File menu, click Print.

You do it exactly the same way in Windows, or see here for a more extensive pre-built list.

One keystroke that will catch you out a few times is Command + h. Ctrl + h in Windows is the shortcut for the Replace dialog. On Mac OS X, Command + h hides the application! Use Command + Shift + H for the Replace dialog on OS X.

With OS X, Apple changed some of the keystrokes reserved for the operating system and added some new ones. On each version of Mac OS, Word follows system convention.

Some Mac keyboards do not have a Forward Delete key. Word needs one: there is a difference in Word between Forward Delete and Back Delete. You will strike it most often in tables: in a Table, Delete becomes 'Clear' which removes the cell contents without removing the cells. Use Cut to delete the cells themselves. Back Delete will remove text within a cell but has no effect if more than one cell is selected. If you are on a Mac laptop, the Forward Delete key is probably Function + Delete.

The Mac has an Option Key, Windows does not have an equivalent. Generally what you expect from the Option key will be on the Control Key in Windows.

Three very commonly-used shortcuts are Command + c (Copy), Command + v (Paste), and Command + s (Save). On Windows these are Ctrl + v, Ctrl + c, and Ctrl + s.

A keystroke that may catch you out a few times is Clear Formatting: on the PC it's Ctrl + q to restore paragraph formatting to that of the underlying style, and Ctrl + Space Bar to restore character (font) formatting. On Mac OS 9, they are the same. On Mac OS X, these are Command + Option + q and Ctrl + Space Bar.

Later versions of Word have an Edit>Clear>Formats command on the Menu bar, which will save you trying to remember the other two. However, note that Clear>Formats resets the formatting back to the formatting of Normal Style (it applies Normal Style) whereas the individual commands simply reset a paragraph to the formatting of the current style.

Different Menus

One thing that will catch you out all the time is that on the Mac, Word adopts the Mac convention of having a Preferences command. In OS X it's on the Application (Word) menu, in OS 9 it's on the Edit menu, again, following the OS convention. On the PC, this is Tools>Options on the Tools menu. It's the same thing, the tabs are exactly the same inside.

Word on the Mac still has a Work menu you can put on your menu bar; this has been replaced by the Task Pane (which is nowhere near as convenient) in later versions of PC Word.

Mac Word also has a Font menu which the PC lacks.

Different Print Mechanism

In order to display a document in WYSIWYG mode, Word needs to know a lot about the capabilities of the printer the document will eventually be sent to.

In Windows this is very simple: Word reads all the information it needs from the printer driver for the printer set as the Windows default. On the Mac, it attempts to do the same thing, but the mechanism is vastly more complex. Look here for more detail.

Some Features Didn't Make it

Making software is a depressingly manual activity. Every line of code has to be planned, typed, and checked. There are more than 30 million of them in Microsoft Office. There simply was not enough time and money to bring all the features of PC Word across to the Mac. And some of them we wouldn't want, anyway! Most of the omissions are of interest only to solution developers:

  • Font embedding is not supported on the Mac.
  • Customized toolbar buttons are supported on the Mac, but the Icon Editor is missing.
  • Speech recognition is not available.
  • HTML support in Word for the Mac is not at the same level as it is in Word on the PC: many web pages load as a shattered mess. The code stripping utility HTMLFilter2 available for the PC is not available for the Mac.
  • Word on the PC has a menu item enabling you to Export to Compact HTML. On the Mac, this is an option on the File>Save As Web Page menu option named Save only display information into HTML. The other option, Save entire file into HTML is the equivalent of the Word PC's Save As Web Page; it saves a Word document expressed in XML. Note: if you 'Save only display information', the file looks the same, but the structural information and content that enable Word to reconstruct a Word document from the XML file has been removed.

Fonts Can be a Problem

On the PC, you can use characters with impunity: if the PC does not have the font, it will find the closest font that contains the character. On the Mac, in Word 2004 and above, you can use the exact same range of characters because Word 2004 is running in Unicode; however, because you cannot embed the font in the document, you need to make sure that each character that you use exists in one or more of the Unicode fonts your recipient has. If in doubt, for PC compatibility, use only the fonts that Microsoft supplies.

Microsoft includes a pack of fonts with Mac Office that have been very carefully hinted to display and print the same on the Mac as the same-named fonts do on the PC. Although the Mac can happily use PC fonts, the rendering of those may be subtly different, particularly on the high-res Mac displays.

Jim Gordon reports that he has no problems at all with the following list of fonts:

Word For Mac Vba

Arial

Calibri

Cambria

Candara

Consolas

Constantia

Corbel

Times New Roman

Verdana

Meiryo

Word For Mac VbaWord For Mac Vba

Jim says 'Office for Mac has a very nice feature to make font compatibility a cinch. When you choose a font using the Home tab of the Ribbon, the first item in the list is Font Collections. The easy way to ensure compatibility is to choose fonts from the Windows Office Compatible font collection submenu.

'If you have company specific fonts they must be installed onto each Mac in order for Mac Word to use them. There is no work-around to the restrictions John mentioned. Fonts embedded by Windows Word are ignored.

'I haven't had problems with cross-platform differences with our HP, Epson, and Lanier printer drivers, but we do test for differences before purchasing so that we don't run into such problems.

While there's no interface on Mac Word to make Font Themes and Color Themes (you can do it in PowerPoint, or with VBA), Themes made on PCs will work on a Mac.

The Advanced Typography settings you can apply in Mac Word will display in Windows Word, but there's no Advanced Typography interface in Word for Windows, so you have to use Mac Word for this feature.

VBA a Level Behind

The VBA level in Mac Word is markedly less capable than in PC Word: around the level of Word 2003 but with missing bits.

Visual Basic for Applications on the Mac is at version 6 (on the PC, this is Word 2000 level of VBA); Word 2013 on the PC is at version 7. Code you write on the Mac will run on the PC if you are careful. Expect code you write on the PC in Word 2000 or above to generate compile- or run-time errors on the Mac.

Active-X controls will not work on Macs. 'Legacy' controls will work. Some of the latest controls from 2103 won't work on a Mac.

Word For Mac Vba Shortcut

Developers should read George Clark's article for more detail.

ActiveX is not supported on the Mac at all. If you create userforms, use only the controls provided in the Forms Toolbar on the Mac, anything else you bring from the PC will generate an error when the user opens the document.

Digital Signatures are not supported on the Mac, and neither is code signing. You will not be able to open a signed project in Mac Word. If the signature prevents you from changing a macro, the code will be execute-only on the Mac.

AppleScript is not available on the PC. VBA is very powerful: investigate scripting your application from AppleScript with VBA, using the 'Do Visual Basic' command.

The VBA Integrated Development Environment is severely cut back on the Mac. If you plan to develop much VBA, invest in a copy of Virtual PC: the productivity you gain is enormous. Hint: Use Windows 7 and NTFS disk format.

for Microsoft Office Excel, Access & Word on Windows or Mac

IDAutomation VBA Barcode Functions and Macros allow easy generation of barcodes in Microsoft Office Suite applications such as Excel, Word and Access on both Windows® and Mac operating systems, compatible with Excel 2003 and greater in Windows and Excel 2011 and greater on Mac. The VBA modules are also compatible with legacy VB6.

These font encoders are used to format the
- Charles Daneri, Objective Systems, LLC (computer consulting firm), Baltimore, MD.

These Office Macros consist of pure VBA modules with customizable code, functions and other options that allow for dynamic and variable data barcode generation. Consequently, this also means that the implementation may be more complicated for the average user. These font encoder tools format data into a text string that will display a readable barcode when the appropriate IDAutomation font is applied to it.

The Macros are free to use with the purchase of any IDAutomation linear barcode font and are compatible with Microsoft Office 2000 and greater running on Windows® or Office 2004 and 2011 for Mac platforms. This tool is not compatible with Office 2008 for Mac because that version does not have VBA capability. IDAutomation has a variety of Mac Barcode Integration options for those using Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac. Mac users and those located outside of the US Western character set should use the IDAutomation Universal Barcode Font Advantage package with related Universal Font VBA functions for Code 128 and Interleaved 2 of 5 fonts.

Importing and Exporting VBA in Excel

The barcode Macros and functions reside inside the Excel file as a custom VBA module. To use these barcode functions in an Excel spreadsheet, the IDAutomationVBAmodule must be imported. If the IDAutomationVBA.bas file is not available for import, it may be exported from the sample spreadsheet provided in the downloaded file. With all 2D font packages, such as QR-Code and
- Thomas Bell, Cynosure, Westford, MA

How to Create a Barcode in Excel

  1. Enable the security setting that allows Macros to run. If prompted when the document re-opens, choose Enable Macros.
    • Office 2007 and above applications require the Macros to run from a trusted location.
    • Office 2004 and 2011 for Mac settings are located at Excel - Preferences - Security - Macro Security.
    • Excel 2000 and 2003 require a medium-security setting to run Macros. Open Excel and set the security level to medium by choosing Tools - Macro - Security.
    • Signed Macros are included in the latest version of the VBA Module download. Simply choose the Trust this Publisher option and the VBA Macros will run unprompted. Data may be pasted into these files and used if the Macros are not modified.
  2. If a different spreadsheet is used other than the sample provided, the Macros must be imported into the spreadsheet.
  3. Create a column in the spreadsheet for the barcode.
  4. Size the column to make sure it is wide enough to contain the entire barcode.
  5. Format the column so that any text appearing in it will be centered. This is necessary to create the white space (often called the quiet zone) before and after the barcode.
  6. Enter the formula in this cell that will format the data to the barcode font. If unsure which function or barcode to use, consider the Code 128 barcode fonts with the =Code128(B10,0) function where 'B10' refers to the cell location of the data that is to be encoded and the ',0' formats the result of the formula to the Code 128 fonts. For all 2D fonts, refer to the documentation within that particular package.
  7. Examine the spreadsheet to make sure the data is being properly formatted to the barcode font. Strange characters may append to the beginning and end of the data from the fields, but this is normal. In some cases, the data may need to be reformatted and may appear scrambled. This is normal for Code 128 and Interleaved 2 of 5 barcode fonts when numbers need to be compressed within the barcode.
  8. After verifying that the text in the cell has been formatted correctly, select the appropriate font and set the point size to 12. This example selects the IDAutomationC128XS font. The XS and S sizes of IDAutomation's fonts in Code 128 and Code 39 are specifically designed to format correctly in Excel, as larger fonts will not usually format correctly in the cell. 2D symbols within Excel directly are only possible with the 2D XLS font for Excel.
  9. Ensure that the column is wide enough to contain the entire barcode with some white space before and after the barcode.
  10. Scan the printed barcodes with a handheld USB barcode scanner to verify the correct data is encoded.

Symbology Specific Tutorials for Excel:

2D Barcodes:
Linear Barcodes:

Barcoding an Entire Column in Excel

IDAutomation's barcode fonts and Macros provide an easy method of barcoding a column in Excel. In this example, Code 128 barcodes are created in Column B from data in Column A. This example assumes the Code 128 Barcode Font Package has been installed, and the VBA module has been imported into the spreadsheet.

  1. Enter the formula in one cell to format the data to the barcode font as explained in the Barcode Tutorial for Excel:
  2. Select that cell and choose Edit - Copy.
  3. At this point, it may be necessary to deselect any cells not needed for barcoding. Then, highlight an entire column by selecting the gray square letter-labeled area at the top of the spreadsheet and choose Edit - Paste. In this example, the button is marked B. If the spreadsheet is large, the formulas may take some time to paste and re-calculate if the spreadsheet is large.
  4. Change the column to the appropriate barcode font. In this example, choose the IDAutomationC128XS font while the entire column that contains the formula is selected. The barcodes will appear in the entire column. When displaying 2D barcodes in Excel such as QR-Code, Data Matrix or PDF417, use the 2D XLS Font specifically designed for Excel at 8 points.
  5. Confirm that the barcodes are accurate by scanning them from printed sheets, or directly from the screen. IDAutomation offers a variety of barcode readers that can perform this function with ease.

Video Tutorials

  • Video: How to Create a Barcode in Excel
  • Video: How to Create a Barcode in Excel 2007 and above
  • Video: How to Create a Barcode on Mac Excel 2004

Access VBA Macro Barcode Functions Tutorial

After the appropriate files have been downloaded and extracted, open the sample Access database provided. This database contains one table, one module, and some sample reports. The module contains custom VBA code, functions, and Macros. The sample database should be used as a reference if help is needed.

How to Create Barcodes in an Access Report

Before starting this tutorial, ensure that VBA Macros are the desired implementation. Several methods of creating barcodes in Access are explained in the Barcode Integration Guide for Microsoft Access.

  1. If a different database is being used and not the sample provided, first import the VBA Macros into the database.
  2. The most recent versions of Access require a medium security setting to run Macros.
    • Open Access and set the security level to medium by choosing Tools - Macro - Security.
    • If prompted when the document is reopened, select Enable Macros.
      Office 2007 and above may require that the Macros run from a trusted location. Signed Macros are included in the latest version of the VBA download. Simply choose the Trust this Publisher option and the VBA Macros will run unprompted. Tables, Reports, Forms and other information may be pasted into these files and used if the Macros are not modified.
  3. Open a report in Design Mode.
  4. Create a text box where the barcode will display.
  5. To format the data to the desired barcode font in a text box, a function must be placed in the Control Source specifying the data field that needs to be encoded.
    • The formula =function([field]) should be entered in the Control Source property of the text box, for example:
    • In some cases, it may be necessary to specify the table and field in the control source, for example: If unsure of which function to use, consider the =Code128([field]) function with Code 128 Barcode Fonts.
    • Optional: The Control Source may be changed to a formula that appends text to the data or combines multiple fields, for example: or or
    • In Code 128, the ApplyTilde feature may also be used to encode tab and return functions. For example, the following formula creates a tab function between two fields:
  6. Run the report to make sure the data is being populated from the fields and formatted to the barcode font. Strange characters may append to the beginning and end of the data, but this is normal. In some cases, the data may need to be reformatted and it may appear to be scrambled. This is normal for Code 128, Interleaved 2 of 5, DataBar and 2D barcodes.
  7. Change the formula field font to the appropriate barcode font and set the point size to 12. If this step is not followed, generated barcodes will not display.
  8. Print and scan the barcodes to verify that the correct data is encoded. If a scanner is needed to verify barcodes, consider the IDAutomation USB Barcode Scanner.

Note: When distributing Access Databases, the associated barcode font must be installed on each computer that prints the barcodes. If this is inconvenient, the Native Barcode Generator for Access is a complete barcode generator object that stays embedded in the database, which means no fonts need to be installed on user computers. For more information about other methods of barcoding in Access, please refer to the Microsoft Access Barcode Integration Guide.

If a large amount of data needs to be encoded, the PDF417 Barcode Font and Encoder or the Data Matrix Barcode Font and Encoder may be the best options as these 2D barcode types allow for the encoding of more data.

Video Tutorial Create a Barcode in Access 2010 and above

VBA & Macro Functions in Microsoft Word Mail-Merge

Before starting this barcode tutorial, ensure VBA Macros are the desired implementation for a Word mail-merge. An easier method exists when using Codabar or Code 39 fonts, and this is explained further in the Barcode Integration Guide for Microsoft Word.

Excel must be used as the data source when creating barcodes in a Microsoft Word mail merge using Macros. The field used for the data source in Word should be the column in Excel where the formula has been applied, which is used to format the data to the barcode font. It is best to use the last column of the spreadsheet in order to avoid merging conflicts.

To set up an Excel spreadsheet with these barcode Macros, refer to the Barcode Tutorial for Excel.

Note: C128 ReturnTypes 6 through 9 are not currently supported in Excel-Word mail-merges.

  1. Excel 2000 and 2003 require a medium security setting to run Macros. Open Excel and set the security level to medium by choosing Tools - Macro - Security.
    Office 2007 and above may require the Macros to run from a trusted location.
    In Office 2004 for Mac, go to Excel - Preferences - Security and select Macro Security to enable the secure setting.
  2. After the files have been downloaded and extracted, open the included Word Mail-Merge document. A message may appear stating that the data source cannot be found. If so, select Data Source for Word Mail Merge.xls as the data source. If asked, enable Macros.
  3. The formula may be viewed in the cells of the Barcode column in the Excel spreadsheet. This formula retrieves the data to encode and passes it to the appropriate barcode function. The function will then format the data to the barcode font. This column is then passed to Word when the mail merge is started. The appropriate barcode font must be selected for the field in MS Word; in this case, it is «Barcode».
  4. The barcode will not look correct and will not scan until the mail merge is performed.
  5. After the merge is performed, print and scan the barcode to verify that the correct data has been encoded. If a scanner is needed to verify barcodes, IDAutomation suggests easy-to-use USB Barcode Scanners.
  6. When distributing the mail-merge, the font should be embedded in Word and the Excel data source must be accessible.

VBA Barcode Macro Functions and Properties

The functions listed below are available in IDAutomation's IDAutomationVBA.bas file and are only valid when used with the font listed in the 'font to use' column. Functions beginning with IDAutomation_Uni_ may only be used with the IDAutomation Universal Barcode Font Advantage™ package and are supplied in the IDAutomationWindowsDLLVBA.bas file provided within that package.

DataToEncode is the string data type for all functions listed below. Other data types such as numbers or dates may need to be converted to the string data type to be properly encoded. Additional parameters are available for some functions and are optional. For example, Code128('123456',0,True). For UPC-A, UPC-E & EAN-13, the +2 and +5 add-on codes may be created by adding the digits to the end of the data being encoded.

Word For Mac Vba File

VBA Functions for Standard Barcode Fonts
Barcode Type Barcode Function Methods Notes VBA File to Import Required Font
Code-11 Code11 (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationC11
Code-128
(Auto Mode)
Code128 (DataToEncode, C128 ReturnType, ApplyTilde)
Human Readable text is enabled when ReturnType = 6
Example:
Code128('123456789012', 6, 0)
IDAutomationVBA.bas
or
IDAutomation VBA for Code 128 and Postnet.bas*
IDAutomationC128
Code-128
(Manual Mode)
IDAutomation recommends using Auto Mode for most situations.
Code128a (DataToEncode, C128 ReturnType)
Code128b (DataToEncode, C128 ReturnType)
Code128c (DataToEncode, C128 ReturnType)
Example:
Code128b('12345678', 6)
IDAutomationVBA.bas
or
IDAutomation VBA for Code 128 and Postnet.bas*
IDAutomationC128
Code-39 Code39 (DataToEncode)
Code39Mod43 (DataToEncode, ReturnType)
Example:
Code39Mod43('12345678', 0)
IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationC39
Code-93 Code93 (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationC93
Codabar Codabar (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationCB
EAN-13 IDAEAN13 (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationUPCEAN
EAN-8 IDAEAN8 (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationUPCEAN
GS1-128 Code128 (DataToEncode, C128 ReturnType, 1)
GS1-128 is enabled in Code 128 Auto by setting ApplyTilde to True. Human Readable AIs may be created by setting the C128 ReturnType to 6. Example:
Code128('(12)3456789012', 6, 1)
IDAutomationVBA.bas
or
IDAutomation VBA for Code 128 and Postnet.bas*
IDAutomationC128
Interleaved 2 of 5 I2of5 (DataToEncode)
I2of5Mod10 (DataToEncode, ReturnType)
Example: I2of5Mod10('123456789', 1)
NOTE: ReturnType 3 generates an OPC (Optical Product Code) symbol. OPC is also known as Vision Council of America OPC, VCA BarCode & VCA OPC.Example: I2of5Mod10('020748721', 3)
IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationI25
MSI / Plessey MSI (DataToEncode, ReturnType)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationMSI
RM4SCC RM4SCC (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationRM
UPC-A UPCa (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationUPCEAN
UPC-E UPCe (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.bas IDAutomationUPCEAN
USPS IntelligentMail (IMb) IntelligentMail (DataToEncode) **
Included only in the purchased version of the USPS IMb Font Package.
IDAutomation VBA for Intelligent Mail.bas IDAutomationPOSTNET
or IDAutomationIMB
USPS Postnet Postnet (DataToEncode, ReturnType)
*Included in Postnet package.
IDAutomationVBA.bas
or
IDAutomation VBA for Code 128 and Postnet.bas*
IDAutomationPOSTNET
USPS Planet Planet (DataToEncode, ReturnType)IDAutomationVBA.bas
or
IDAutomation VBA for Code 128 and Postnet.bas*
IDAutomationPOSTNET
not applicable MOD10 (DataToEncode)IDAutomationVBA.basnot applicable
not applicable SpliceText (DataToEncode, SpacingNumber, ApplyTilde)IDAutomationVBA.basnot applicable
Functions for the Universal Barcode Font
All functions listed below are preceded with IDAutomation_Uni_.* They may only be used with the IDAutomation Universal Barcode Font Advantage™ and are supplied in the IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas or the IDAutomationWindowsDLLVBA.bas file which also requires the installation of the product EXE file in order for the macro to function, because they access an installed IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll that is provided within the package.

Note: Excel 2004 for Mac requires the functions to be lowercase. Ex: idautomation_uni_c128

Barcode Type Universal Function Methods Notes VBA File to Import Required Font
Code-128 IDAutomation_Uni_C128 (DataToEncode, ApplyTilde)
Note: Code128() is the recommended method to use. Code128() is also used to create GS1-128.

IDAutomation_Uni_C128A (DataToEncode)
IDAutomation_Uni_C128B (DataToEncode)
IDAutomation_Uni_C128C (DataToEncode)
Example:
IDAutomation_Uni_C128 ('Ê8100712345Ê2112WH5678', TRUE)

Excel for Mac:
idautomation_uni_c128 ('Ê8100712345Ê2112WH5678', TRUE)
IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
not applicableC128HR (DataToEncode, ApplyTilde)
Returns text for Code 128 barcodes, such as for GS1-128.
IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
Text Font
Code-39 IDAutomation_Uni_C39 (DataToEncode, N_Dimension, IncludeCheckDigit)
Example:
IDAutomation_Uni_C39 ('123456789', 3, TRUE )

Excel for Mac:
idautomation_uni_c39 ('123456789', 3, TRUE )
IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
Codabar IDAutomation_Uni_Codabar (DataToEncode, N_Dimension, StartChar, StopChar)
Example:
IDAutomation_Uni_Codabar ('123456789', 3,'A','B' )

Excel for Mac:
idautomation_uni_codabar ('123456789', 3,'A','B' )
IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
Interleaved 2 of 5 IDAutomation_Uni_I2of5 (DataToEncode, N_Dimension, IncludeCheckDigit)IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
MSI / Plessey IDAutomation_Uni_MSI (DataToEncode, N_Dimension, IncludeCheckDigit)IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
USPS IntelligentMail IDAutomation_Uni_IntelligentMail (DataToEncode) ** IDAutomation_UniversalFont_USPS_IMb_VBA.bas IDAutomation_Uni
USPS Postnet IDAutomation_Uni_Postnet (DataToEncode, IncludeCheckDigit) IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
USPS Planet IDAutomation_Uni_Planet (DataToEncode, IncludeCheckDigit)IDAutomation_UniversalFont_VBA.bas
or
IDautomation_WindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll
IDAutomation_Uni
Functions for the DataBar Barcode Font
The functions listed below are preceded with IDAutomation_GS1 and are only provided with the IDAutomation DataBar Font Advantage Package.
Barcode Type DataBar Barcode Function Methods Notes VBA File to Import Required Font
DataBar DataBar (DataToEncode)IDAutomationGS1DataBar.bas IDAutomation DataBar 34
DataBar Expanded DataBarExpanded (DataToEncode, 22)IDAutomationGS1DataBar.bas IDAutomation DataBar 34
DataBar Exp. Stacked DataBarExpanded (DataToEncode, Segments)IDAutomationGS1DataBar.bas IDAutomation DataBar 34
DataBar Stacked Omnidirectional DataBarStacked (DataToEncode)IDAutomationGS1DataBar.bas IDAutomation DataBar 34
The functions listed below are rare and not approved for POS systems.
DataBar Limited DataBarLimited (DataToEncode) (Not approved for POS)IDAutomationNativeWindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll IDAutomation DataBar 13
DataBar Stacked DataBarStacked (DataToEncode) (Not approved for POS)IDAutomationNativeWindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll IDAutomation DataBar 13
DataBar Truncated DataBar (DataToEncode) (Not approved for POS)IDAutomationNativeWindowsDLLVBA.bas and IDAutomationNativeFontEncoder.dll IDAutomation DataBar 13
2D Font Functions
Regarding all symbologies listed in this section below:
  • VBA code for these functions will be provided within each package of the purchased 2D font product.
  • Symbology options and parameter changes to functions listed below may be made within the code of the function itself.
Barcode Type 2D Function Methods Notes VBA File to Import Required Font
Data MatrixIDAutomation_DMatrix_FontEncoder(DataToEncode As String, Optional ProcessTilde, Optional EncodingMode, Optional PreferredFormat)
Complete VBA is only provided in the purchased version.
IDAutomation_DM_FontEncoder.bas
(2020 Release)
IDAutomation2D or IDAutomationDMatrix
EncDM(DataToEncode As String, Optional ProcessTilde, Optional EncodingMode, Optional PreferredFormat) IDAutomation_Datamatrix_ActiveX_Macro.bas and IDAutomationDMatrix.dll
(Legacy ActiveX Version)
QR-CodeIDAutomation_QRFontEncoder(DataToEncode)
All parameters are set to default except ApplyTilde which is set to 1.
IDAutomation_VBA_QRCode_FE2021
(2021 Release)
IDAutomation2D
PDF417IDAutomation_PDF417(DataToEncode As String, Optional EccLevel As Integer, Optional ColumnSpecify As Integer, Optional RowSpecify As Integer, Optional Truncate As Integer, Optional ForceBinary As Integer) As StringIDAutomation_Native_PDF417_Macro.bas IDAutomation2D or IDAutomationPDF417
IDAutomation_PDF417(DataToEncode As String, Optional EcLevel As Integer, Optional TotalColumns As Integer, Optional TotalRows As Integer, Optional Truncated As Integer, Optional PDFMode As Integer, Optional ApplyTilde As Integer) As String
IDAutomation_PDF417_Macro.bas and IDAutomationPDF417.dll
(Legacy ActiveX Version)
AztecEncAztec(DataToEncode As String,
Optional
ProcessTilde, Optional Error Correction)
IDAutomation_Aztec_Macro.bas and
IDAutomationAztec.dll
IDAutomation2D
MaxicodeEncMC(DataToEncode as String, Optional EncodingMode as Int)
The default Encoding Mode is 2
IDAutomation_MaxiCode_Macros.bas IDAutomation Maxicode

Wps Mac Vba

Word For Mac Vba

Barcode Function Descriptions

Excel For Mac Vba

  • ApplyTilde: If set to '1' or 'True', characters following the tilde may be used to perform additional calculations or encode ASCII characters directly.
  • DataToEncode: This string value represents the data being encoded.
  • N_Dimension: Determines the width of the wide bars when applicable, which is a multiple of the X dimension. Valid values are 2, 2.5 and 3. The default is 2. The X dimension is determined by the font point size.
  • IncludeCheckDigit: A Boolean value that determines whether a check digit should be automatically calculated and included for the DataToEncode.
  • Segments: Reducing segments to a low, even number such as 4, 6 or 8 in a DataBar Expanded symbol can create a stacked barcode. The default is 22.

Word Mac Vba Editor

** The USPS Intelligent Mail (IMb) function is supplied in pure VBA code with the purchased version of the associated font package.